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"Arctic and Tourism: Acclimatization in Transcontinental Travels" - click here for the recording!

Dr. Elena A. Grigorieva

Institute for Complex Analysis of Regional Problems, Far-Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

Vice President, International Society of Biometeorology

"Why the Arctic matters - for everyone" - click here for the recording!

Dr. Keith Larson

Climate Impacts Research Centre, Umeå University, Sweden

"Tourism Climatology: Past, Present and Future" - click here for the recording!

Dr. Michelle Rutty

Faculty of Environment, University of Waterloo, Canada

Co-Chair, Commission on Climate, Tourism and Recreation, International Society of Biometeorology

Panelists:

Dr. David R. Perkins IV

Department of Geography, Geology, and Planning, Missouri State University, USA

Co-Chair, Commission on Climate, Tourism and Recreation, International Society of Biometeorology

Dr. O. Cenk Demiroglu

Department of Geography, Umeå University, Sweden

Co-Chair, Commission on Climate, Tourism and Recreation, International Society of Biometeorology

Dr. Robert Steiger

Department of Public Finance, University of Innsbruck, Austria

Co-Chair, Commission on Climate, Tourism and Recreation, International Society of Biometeorology

Dr. Elena A. Grigorieva

"Arctic and Tourism: Acclimatization in Transcontinental Travels"

Dr. Elena A. Grigorieva is the leading researcher in laboratory of regional social-economical systems at the Institute for Complex Analysis of Regional Problems, Far-Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences (ICARP FEB RAS) since 2013. Earlier she was researcher (1995–2002) and scientific secretary (2002–2013) at the same institute. She graduated as a Specialist with Honors in Meteorology from the Russian State Hydrometeorological University in St.-Petersburg. Elena has her PhD in Environmental Science from the Far-Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok. She is a well-known bioclimatologist, an active member (2005–present) and Vice President (2014–2017, 2017–2020, and 2020–2023) of the International Society of Biometeorology, member of ‘Climate, Tourism and Recreation Commission’, and ‘Climate and Human Health Commission’. Elena is a member of ‘Women in Science and Engineering Committee’ in ‘Association of Academies and Scientific Societies in Asia’ (2017–2019, 2019–2021). Her research interests cover a number of themes in biometeorology, which include climate and tourism, climate and human health, environmental health threats by climate, human thermal acclimatization in extreme climates, human bioclimatic indices, urban climate, climate and agriculture. Elena serves as Editorial Board Member in “Regional Problems”, ICARP FEB RAS (since 2002), Editorial Board Member in “International Journal of Biometeorology”, Springer (since 2020), and Topic Editor in Journal Topics Board of scientific journal “Climate”, MDPI (since 2020).

 

Dr. Keith Larson

"Why the Arctic matters - to everyone"

Keith Larson, PhD, is a scientist and science communicator that manages the Climate Impacts Research Centre for Umeå University from the Swedish Abisko Scientific Research Station. He lives in the Arctic on the frontline of climate change with his family that includes his wife and two daughters, aged 6 and 3 years old. Living two hundred kilometres north of the Arctic Circle, he walks his daughter to kindergarten in 24-hour daylight in the summer and 24-hour darkness with -20 to -30° C weather in the winter.

Keith has spent his career working as a scientist traveling the world experiencing the impacts of climate and environmental change on wildlife and ecosystems from the arctic to the tropics. The inspiration for his work comes from being in the field and experiencing nature. His current research focuses on comparing research conducted on plants in mountain regions over 100 years ago, before modern human-caused climate change, to the conditions found today. It is with this “time machine” approach that he and other scientists can measure change that has already taken place due to climate change and possibly predict the future for earth’s species and ecosystems. Currently, he is collaborating with a group of diverse interdisciplinary international researchers from Sweden, Canada, Great Britain, Germany, Switzerland, and Denmark.

Importantly, he has a passion for teaching and sharing his experiences as a scientist with the public. Science communications and the public engagement in science is a strong feature of all his work. In Abisko, he has developed a public outreach and citizen science program aimed at increasing the public’s awareness of climate change, how scientists conduct their science and the role science plays in dealing with the most important issues facing humanity. He believes that the best approach to dealing with truly global threats such as climate change is working together inclusively, that is, across borders, political and religious affiliations. This approach requires the use of evidence-based decision-making based on the best science available.

Why the Arctic matters - to everyone

The Arctic is a region that has long captured the imagination of explorers, scientists and tourists. Polar bears, ice sheets, reindeer, glaciers and the aurora borealis have created a mystic about a distance place where few people travel. The reality is much different. For thousands of years indigenous people have lived on the land and created livelihoods dependent on the snow and ice. It is in these regions that the signatures of human-caused global heating are seared into the landscape challenging their resilience. Despite the fact that the region has a very low population density and is not responsible for the majority of the human-caused greenhouse gas emissions, it is here that climate change is impacting people today. However, this distance will not protect the rest of the non-arctic inhabitants from the worst impacts of climate change. As the Arctic warms, previously frozen stores of carbon are mobilized, from permafrost soils to methane hydrates found on the bottom of the ocean. The Arctic is the canary in the coalmine. Thus, it is thus essential to understand how global heating is transforming the Arctic and what that means for the future of humanity.

 

Dr. Michelle Rutty

"Tourism Climatology: Past, Present and Future"

Michelle Rutty is a Canada Research Chair in Tourism, Environment & Sustainability, and an Assistant Professor at the University of Waterloo (Canada). Her research expertise seeks to understand the decision-making process and behavioural response of tourists to past, present and projected environmental change, as well as the climatic risks and emerging opportunities for tourism operators and destinations.

 

Dr. David R. Perkins IV

"Tourism Climatology: Past, Present and Future"

David R Perkins IV is an assistant professor of geography and sustainable tourism at Missouri State University. His research explores the geographies of sustainable tourism development strategy and how tourists perceive and react to varying weather conditions.

 

Dr. O. Cenk Demiroglu

"Tourism Climatology: Past, Present and Future"

O. Cenk Demiroglu is affiliated with the Department of Geography, Humlab and the Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University, Sweden. He is also a member of the Advisory Board for the Centre for Climate Change and Policy Studies (IklimBU) at Boğaziçi University, Turkey. His research interests focus on climate change and ski tourism, with teaching expertise in geographical information systems and destination development.

 

Dr. Robert Steiger

"Tourism Climatology: Past, Present and Future"

Robert Steiger is Associate Professor at the Department of Public Finance, University of Innsbruck, Austria. His research focuses on climate change impacts on and adaptation of the tourism supply and demand side as well as sustainable development of the tourism industry.

 

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